If you know someone living with substance use disorder, the best thing you can do is love them unconditionally—and contact an interventionist. Scott Silverman is an interventionist and crisis coach, and he knows what it’s like to fall victim to addiction. After establishing his own recovery journey, the first thing he did was begin helping others start theirs.

His first mission was Second Chance, designed to help the homeless and the jobless get back on their feet. Next, he founded Confidential Recovery, an outpatient treatment center. He even found the time to write a few books, one detailing his story and the other designed to raise awareness about the opioid epidemic.

He encourages anyone suffering to reach out to him personally because he understands addiction, knows how to connect people with the right resources, and is constantly working to end the stigma surrounding addiction. We’ve talked about what loved ones can do to help end stigma, but even some interventionists still have a lot to learn.

These are a few things today’s interventionists need to remember to help today’s addicts:

1.   Many are functioning.

Just because someone has a job does not mean that they are okay. The National Institutes of Health estimates that 20% of alcoholics are high-functioning, according to a 2007 study.

2.   They are scared to tell the truth.

Scott has been very open about his recovery journey, and in a 2011 TEDx talk he recounted how he was so afraid to explain a 4-day blackout to colleagues that he nearly chose suicide. Healthline offers advice on communicating with addicts using respect, compassion, and patience.

3.   Addiction is a disease.

Addiction is not a moral failing. Recognize that addicts are typically impulsive and likely to relapse or move on to a different substance if they do not receive continued support. As the National Institute on Drug Abuse says, “Patients typically require long-term or repeated episodes of care to achieve the ultimate goal of sustained abstinence and recovery of their lives.”

4.   Don’t assume someone with SUD wouldn’t appreciate a new opportunity.

Scott started Second Chance because the soup kitchen where he volunteered had so many repeat visitors. When Scott asked the other volunteers why the regulars didn’t have jobs, they responded, “They don’t want one.” However, when he asked a regular why he didn’t have a job, he said, “No one will give me one.”

The man wanted one. He just needed guidance. Scott provided it, and with this first person’s success, he saw an opportunity to scale, to become a “social entrepreneur.” Second Chance, and Scott’s life’s work, was born.

It never helps an interventionist to assume that they know a person who is struggling better than they know themselves. Take the time to communicate, to listen, and both of you will be better for it.

You’ve probably seen the Hollywood version of an intervention. Usually, there is a lot of drama, yelling, and tears. The truth is, this may be what you experience if you choose to stage an intervention for a loved one. However, if you follow the three tips below, it’s more likely to be a smooth process that convinces them to seek help.

1.   Come Prepared

U.S. News and World Report emphasizes the importance of going into an intervention prepared. You can’t let emotions lead the way on this; you must stay focused on the goal, and that goal is to educate your loved one and convince them to get the help they need. Go armed with facts so you don’t add misinformation to the mix.

Some ways to make sure you stay focused on the task at hand include: obtain research from reputable sources, consult a doctor or other expert for advice, and take notes to use during the event.

2.   Expect Resistance

Denial is common during interventions. Nearly 20% of all alcoholics are functional, making it easy for many people suffering from substance use disorder (SUD) to justify their behavior. It can’t be that bad if they have their life together, right? The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) states that it’s all too common for addicts to deny their illness. They believe that they drink an average amount, or that everyone takes drugs.

The Mayo Clinic has some great advice on how to organize a successful intervention, despite resistance. Some of their tips include: plan the event thoroughly, research, perform a rehearsal, avoid confrontation, and do not give your loved one time to think about their decision.

You must demand an immediate decision, and you must be willing to act on the consequences you present if they do not agree to seek help.

3.   Ask for Help

Every source we’ve mentioned in this article states that having help from a professional can be a valuable asset during an intervention. A family navigator and professional crisis coach like Scott H. Silverman can help you organize the intervention, suggest resources, and provide a source of stability during this emotionally charged time.

Scott provides resources like trained counselors, intervention planning, and even providing an escort to treatment for the recovering addict.

Scott has been helping addicts and their loved ones overcome the obstacles standing between addiction and recovery for more than three decades. As a recovering addict himself, Scott can offer a unique view to friends and family and a genuine connection with the addict.

Scott is a crisis coach, family navigator, and interventionist. He’s seen and heard it all. As he helps addicts get on the road to recovery, one of his main goals is to reduce the stigma surrounding addiction. Just as you would look to a professional for guidance when dealing with cancer or diabetes, you shouldn’t be afraid to seek help for your or a loved one’s addiction.

If you are facing a situation with a loved one, spouse, or even a child that has started to spiral, please call us at (619) 452–1200. Read more about our interventions here.

 

Scott H. Silverman recently appeared on America Trends to discuss the shocking death toll wrought by the Opioid Epidemic, and share thoughts about how we can make progress against this "pandemic within a pandemic."

His segment on August 11th, 2021 discussed his background and recovery and talked about how he approaches his work in helping those with a SUD by “meeting them where they are at” to reduce the stigma of addiction, which is a huge hurdle that we need to overcome as a society in order to make progress in the battle against the opioid epidemic.

Watch the entire segment here: https://youtu.be/TV2_3uTDNQ4

 

"San Diego county has seen a significant increase in overdoses. According to the County Office of Communications, there were 457 fentanyl-related overdose deaths alone in 2020 across San Diego county, a 202% increase from 151 recorded deaths in 2019."

These are the kinds of insights that caused The East County Californian to write an article about Scott's efforts to educate and save lives.

“The prescription meds kids are taking, mixed with other toxins— the body doesn’t have the capacity for those combinations. There’s no science around that yet, there’s no longitudinal study for Lexapro with methamphetamine."

The article also talks about Scott's new book The Opioid Epidemic, which he says is “a roadmap for families to have conversations, build awareness." He wants people to be aware that

"young people can take something that looks like Xanax, a prescription-strength sedative thinking they are going to feel mellowed out for a few hours. Instead, he said, a pill that looks like Xanax might be laced with Fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that can be deadly when consumed with alcohol and is a major contributor to the opioid overdose rate."

Read the entire article on The East County Californian here.

 

© 2021 Confidential Recovery, Outpatient Rehab in San Diego

About Confidential and Scott H. Silverman: Scott has been fighting  against addiction for over 20 years, one person, speech, and book at a time.  Contact us by calling (619)452-1200 or visit Your Crisis Coach to learn more about Scott's work and public appearances.  You can buy a copy of his latest book "The Opioid Epidemic" here.

Scott covered a wide range of topics, including:

Of course, Scott also answered questions about his new book, "The Opioid Epidemic," which is now shipping and you can purchase here.

Watch the entire segment here: Scott H. Silverman on Fox News 32 Chicago.

© 2021 Confidential Recovery, Outpatient Rehab in San Diego

About Confidential and Scott H. Silverman: Scott has been fighting  against addiction for over 20 years, one person, speech, and book at a time.  Contact us by calling (619)452-1200 or visit Your Crisis Coach to learn more about Scott's work and public appearances.  You can buy a copy of his latest book "The Opioid Epidemic" here.

Listen to Jon Dwoskin's five-part interview series with Scott H. Silverman,  author of The Opioid Epidemic: What You Don’t Know Will Destroy Your Family and Your Life.

Scott goes in depth on the opioid epidemic, how it is affecting us, and most importantly, what we can do about it

The segments include:

Listen to the entire series here. Jon Dwoskin's popular "Coffee with Jon" podcast highlights information and insights from this highly influential business coach, mentor, executive coach, author, and speaker.

 

© 2021 Confidential Recovery, Outpatient Rehab in San Diego

About Confidential and Scott H. Silverman: Scott has been fighting  against addiction for over 20 years, one person, speech, and book at a time.  Contact us by calling (619)452-1200 or visit Your Crisis Coach to learn more about Scott's work and public appearances.  You can buy a copy of his latest book "The Opioid Epidemic" here.

The First and Most Important Thing

Help is available and treatment works. There’s absolutely no downside to reaching out for help immediately to ask questions about your current situation.

Call us now at (619) 452–1200 if you have any questions about addiction or recovery, for you or your loved one.

First Responders Are Expected to Need Help

First responders should not be shy about asking for help with a substance use disorder. It has always been 'part of the job,' and the recent pandemic and other societal factors have increased the stress that first responders and emergency personnel are under.

If you are a member of the police, fire department, or medical community, your organization has infrastructure to support you getting help.  Contact your employee assistance department to get help.

Who Pays for the Treatment?

First responders will job insurance and employee assistance programs to help pay for treatment.  When you work with the admissions department at a treatment program, they will help facilitate the process of contacting your insurance benefits provider and explaining what your 'out of pocket costs' (if any) will be. You will want to have a copy of your benefits card ready to show the admissions counselor.

Why First Responders Need Specialized Addiction Treatment

It is generally helpful for all people who seek treatment to be with their peers. Firemen, police, paramedics, and doctors respond better to treatment if it involves a group of other emergency personnel.  Our treatment center in San Diego provide outpatient treatment that many veterans and first responders.

First Responders Need Tools to Manage Stress

First responders will need to be given tools to manage stress as they returned to their professions. Mindfulness training and experiential activities are very helpful

Enhanced Relapse Prevention Training for those with Access to Medications  

Many first responders like doctors, nurses, and paramedics, will also often have access to medications when they return to their professions.  This requires additional relapse prevention tools so that the person .

Evidence Based Treatment

Read our article called Addiction Treatment 101 to learn about the various levels of treatment.  This article will answer many of your questions.  Access to the full range of other evidence-based treatment modalities. At our San Diego outpatient treatment program, here are some of the activities that recovering first responders participate in:

Why Wait When Help is Available Now?

Treatment that is effective and tailored to meet the needs of San Diego first responders is available now. Addiction is progressive and the people who really get better are those who get clinical help. Call us today to get the process started so that you or the first responder in your life gets the necessary help to live life without the influence of substances.

You can call us right now at (619) 452–1200 if you want to talk to one of America’s leading experts in overcoming addiction.

 

 

© 2021 Confidential Recovery, Outpatient Rehab in San Diego

About Confidential and Scott H. Silverman: Scott has been fighting  against addiction for over 20 years, one person, speech, and book at a time.  Contact us by calling (619)452-1200 or visit Your Crisis Coach to learn more about Scott's work and public appearances.  You can buy a copy of his latest book "The Opioid Epidemic" here.

Scott. H. Silverman joined KUSI’s Elizabeth Alvarez on Good Morning San Diego to divulge in just a few of his tricks and tips on how those struggling can go from addiction to recovery and how their families can navigate those waters.

To watch the entire segment, go here.

To jump to Scott's segment, go here.

Scott was recently featured at a Symposium on America's Drug Epidemic in San Diego. The presentation also featured U.S. Attorney Laura Duffy, San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore, San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman, Dr. Greg LaDue, and Scott H. Silverman. The City Club, in association with the First United Methodist Church of San Diego, Congregation

 

View the Interview on Breath Body Connection.

This interview with Scott Silverman, Expert Crisis Coach, author and speaker, is filled with mind blowing stats on opioids, alcoholism, and mood altering substances plus a lot more.

Main take away is that if you think you have a problem, please get the support you need.  He even offered his number, so if you need support or have questions, don't hesitate to contact Scott at 619-993-2738.

His latest book,"The Opioid Epidemic" can be purchased on amazon.  Here is the link.

 

chevron-down linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram